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kibera saccos.

 

Due to the changing face of Kibera, many things have taken different shapes, compare the social activities in the last 5year, the roads and the connectivity through Kibera were very narrow that trucks could not Go thorough from one side to the other, movement of goods was a hustle, inaccessible fire rescue and ambulance services.   Only bicycles and motorbike could go through and did most of transportation work. Now with the new roads, life has completely changed, the link that was somehow missing in between has been fixed making Kibera easily connecting to the rest of the city.

It’s always known that every development comes with its negative and positive developments. As for Kibera, the residents have taken advantage of this development; the youth have now started engaging in small scale transport services, taking people through Kibera. This has created job opportunity to both young and old, many youths working in the Kibera lindi Sacco are now a reformed lot, away from idling, abusing drugs, and committing petty crimes, to helping the community in their service as either Drivers or touts. Making sure their passengers reach their destination safely.

Business has improved since the same matatu as called in kenya. are used to ferry goods from the market to the shops around Kibera. The residents don’t get late to work. And now Kibera routes have turned into a hive of activities the matatu (14 seater nissan), tuktuk, motorbikes, and the movement of people… Comparing the type of matatu operating in Nairobi the contrast is evident the Kibera Sacco mainly use the unroad worthy and uninsured. for transport while the rest of Nairobi, there are un-comparable classic type of public transport.

Edited by Amos Wandera

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